MINNESOTA DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC SAFETY DRIVER

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GUIDE TO MINNESOTACRASH DATA FILESMINNESOTA DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC SAFETYDRIVER AND VEHICLE SERVICES DIVISIONCRASH RECORDS SECTIONAugust, 2006

GUIDE TO MINNESOTA CRASH DATA FILESTABLE OF CONTENTSIntroduction. 1Table 1: List of Crash Data Fields in File Sequence . 4Table 2: List of Crash Data Fields in Alphabetical Sequence . 5Table 3: The Crash File. 7Table 4: The Vehicle File . 17Table 5: The person File . 26Appendix:1. County Codes . 332. US State and Canadian Province Codes. 333. City Codes, Alphabetical by City Name . 344. City Codes, Alphabetical within County. 385. Township Codes, Alphabetical within County. 42

GUIDE TO MINNESOTA CRASH DATA FILESINTRODUCTIONReportable Traffic CrashesThe Minnesota Department of Public Safety (DPS), Driver and Vehicle Services (DVS)division is required by law to be the centralized place for maintaining reports on trafficcrashes that occur in Minnesota. Within ten days of a crash, law enforcement officers arerequired to submit reports on crashes they investigate that meet the reporting thresholdprovided in statute. The current threshold is that there was 1,000 or more in propertydamage, or that anyone was injured or killed, due to the crash.As a further part of the definition of when a crash is reportable, it must have occurred on aroadway open to the public by right or custom, and there must have been at least one motorvehicle in transport involved in the crash. Crashes on private property or not involving amotor vehicle in transport are sometimes reported to DPS. Those reports are processed andretained, but do not become a part of the computerized traffic crash database from whichstatistics on reportable crashes are compiled.How Reports May Be SubmittedLaw enforcement officers may submit the crash report on paper through the US mail.Alternatively, since January 1, 2003, officers may, and are encouraged to, submit the crashreport online.When DVS receives the report, staff in the Crash Records section process it. If the report ison paper, they enter the data from the paper report into the computer. If the report is online,the officer’s entries go directly into the database. However, for all crashes, Crash Recordsstaff still has to carefully determine certain technical location information (route system,route number, and reference point) and enter that into the computer.Some law enforcement agencies are now developing new Records Management Systems(RMS) that include an ability to build data files based on information collected via the RMS.These agencies may, and are encouraged to, help the State be more efficient by submittingtheir crash data as electronic files, thus bypassing both the paper report and the online reporton individual crashes.Page 1, Guide to Minnesota Crash Data Files

Three Data Files Comprise the Crash DatabaseAgencies that send electronic data files to DVS must make sure the files conform to thestructure of the State’s crash database. The database is comprised of three files: the crashfile, the vehicle file, and the person file. This document shows the valid values for everyfield in each file and describes validity checks that are desirable to have in place. The checksare very straightforward; e.g.: the date of birth for a person in a crash should not be after thedate of the crash; if “number of persons killed in crash” “1,” then there must be one andonly one “person record” with “Injury Severity” “K” (killed).The Crash File.The crash file has one record for each crash, and contains overall information about thecrash; for example: date and time, location, whether property besides vehicles wasdamaged, type of roadway, traffic control device at scene of crash, and so on. Forconvenience, crash-level fields are enumerated C101 to C158. The crash file may bethought of as having the following subsections:C101 - C113:C114 - C129:C130 - C132:C133 - C151:C152 - C153:C154 - C158:Preliminary informationLocation informationDamaged property information and yellow-tag numberGeneral crash informationSketch and narrative descriptionAgency and officer informationThe Vehicle FileThe vehicle file contains one record for each motor vehicle or non-motorist involved inthe crash. A motor vehicle may be “in transport” or not in transport. For example, alegally parked vehicle, or a road grader doing work, is not “in transport.”A non-motorist is a person involved in the crash but who is not in or on a motor vehicle -mainly, a pedestrian or a bicyclist. (Though rare, other examples of a “non-motorist” are:a skater; a person using a motorized wheelchair, or any type of wheelchair; a personriding a horse, or persons in a horse-drawn cart.) A pedestrian is not a vehicle, and thusthe term “vehicle file” is a slight misnomer, but is used for convenience as a shorthandfor “motor vehicle or non-motorist file.”The vehicle file contains information specific to vehicles and non-motorists, includingvehicle owner’s name and address; make, model, year, color, license plate, and state ofregistration of the vehicle; pre-crash actions of the vehicle or non-motorist; andcontributing factors associated with the vehicle or non-motorist.Vehicle-level fields are enumerated V101 to V142, and there is a subset that pertains justto commercial motor vehicles:Page 2, Guide to Minnesota Crash Data Files

V101 - V135: All vehicles, including commercial vehicles. Also, all non-motorists(pedestrians, bicyclists, and so on)V136 - V142: Commercial vehicles onlyThe Person file.The person file should have one record for every person involved in the crash. A personis considered involved in the crash if he or she (1) was a driver of a vehicle in the crash,(2) was a passenger in a vehicle in the crash, (3) was a pedestrian or bicyclist or othernon-motorist who was struck by a vehicle in the crash.Note that in a sense a person involved in a crash is a “witness” to the crash, but the term“witness” is used in the more conventional sense of an observer who is not involved.Thus, officers may collect information from witnesses to help them complete the crashreport, but information about witnesses should not be entered in the person file.Note also that if a vehicle in transport collides with a parked vehicle, with no one in it,the parked vehicle should have a record in the vehicle file, but there should not be anyperson records associated with the parked vehicle in the person file. An officer willnormally collect and enter information about the owner of the parked vehicle, but ownerinformation is part of the vehicle file, not part of the person file. On the other hand, ifthere were occupants in the parked vehicle at the time of the crash, then each of thoseoccupants should have one record in the person file.Finally, note that while a traffic crash must involve at least one motor vehicle intransport, it is possible for a traffic crash to be reportable and yet not involve any persons.This happens a few times per year in Minnesota (out of about 95,000 crashes annually).The way in which this occurs is that a person gets out of a vehicle and inadvertentlyleaves it in gear. The vehicle, with no one it, then proceeds to go, on a public roadway,until it collides with something, such as a parked vehicle or sign.Person file fields are enumerated P101 to P137.To summarize: The crash file must have one and only one record for every crash. The vehicle file must have one and only one record for every motor vehicle in transport,or not in transport, and for every non-motorist in the crash. The vehicle record must betied to its appropriate crash record by a common identifier. The person file must have one and only one record for every person involved in the crash.The person record must be tied to its appropriate vehicle record and crash record bycommon identifiers.Page 3, Guide to Minnesota Crash Data Files

Some Acronyms Used in the Tables Below:DPS:DVS:BCA:NCIC:Department of Public SafetyDriver and Vehicle Services division of DPS.Bureau of Criminal Apprehension, another division within DPSNational Crime Information Center, a source of information about vehicle makesand modelsMNDOT: Minnesota Department of Transportation.Overview of Tables: Table 1 (page 5) lists all fields, approximately in the order that the fields are encounteredon the law enforcement crash report form. Table 2 (page 6) lists all fields in alphabetical sequence by name of field. Table 3 (pages 7-16) describes the 58 fields in the crash file. Table 4 (pages 17-25) describes the 42 fields in the Vehicle file. Table 5 (pages 26-32) describes the 37 fields in the Person file. The appendix (pages 33-49) provides lengthy listings of codes for cities and townshipsthat were too long to be included in Table 3.Page 4, Guide to Minnesota Crash Data Files

TABLE 1: CRASH DATA FIELDS(in sequence approximately as the fields are located on the crash report form)CRASH FILECRASH FILE (Continued)PERSON FILEPreliminary InformationSketch and 111C112C113C152C153P101P102LOCAL CASE NOAMENDEDHIT-AND-RUNPUB PROPNUM VEHICLESNUM KILLEDNUM INJURED MINMONTHDATEYEARDAYMILITARY TIMELocation 3C124C125C126C127C128C129X COORDINATEY COORDINATEROUTE SYSTEM 1ROUTE NUM / STREETNAMEROADWAY DIRECTIONAT INTERSEC-TION WITHDISTANCEMI / FTN/S/E/WCOUNTYCITY / TWPCITY / TWP NAMEINT ELEMREFERENCE POINTROUTE SYSTEM 2ROUTE #, STREET, CORPLIMIT, .Damaged property informationC130C131C132DAMAGED PROPERTYOWNERDAMAGED PROPERTYDESCRIPTIONYELLOW TAG NUMBERGeneral crash SLOCATION FHEON BRIDGETYPE WZLOC OF CRASH/WZWORKERS PRESENTRDESGNRDSURFRDCHARDEVICEWORKINGINT RELSPEED LIMITWEATHER 1WEATHER 2LIGHTPHOTOS TAKENDIAGRAMSKETCHNARRATIVEOfficer and agency informationC154C155C156C157C158OFFICER RANKOFFICER NAMEOFFICER BADGE #PATROL DIST/ STATIONOFFICER TYPEVEHICLE FILEAll vehicles and 135LOCAL CASE NORVN: RELATIVE VEHICLENUMBEROWNER FIRST NAMEOWNER MIDDLE NAMEOWNER LAST NAMEADDRESSCITYSTATEZIP CODEFACTOR1FACTOR2MANEUVERFIRETOWPULLING UNITDIRECTMAKEMODELYEARCOLORPLATE #ST REGYEAR REGFIRST EVENTSECOND EVENTTHIRD EVENTFOURTH EVENTMOST HARM EVENTINSURANCEPOLICY NUMBEROCCUPVEH TYPEVEH USEDMG LOCDMG 127P128P129P130P131P132P133P134P135P136P137LOCAL CASE NORVN: RELATIVE VEHICLENUMBERRPN: RELATIVE PERSONNUMBERPOSITIONDL NUMBERDL STATEDL CLASSENDORSE-MENTSDL STATUSFIRST NAMEMIDDLE NAMELAST NAMEDATE OF BIRTHAGEADDRESSCITYSTATEZIP CODEADDRESS CORRECTDR VIOLATIONRESTRICSEXSAFE EQPT TYPESAFE EQPT USEAIRBAGEJECTINJ SEVALC TSTTYPE OF ALC TESTDR TSTTYPE OF DRUG TESTTO HOSPTRANSPORTAMBULANCE SERVICERUN NUMBERPHYSCLRCOMNDCommercial vehicles onlyV136V137V138V139V140V141V142CARGO BDY TYPEHAZ MAT PLACWAIVEDINSPECTION #BADGE #MOTOR CARRIER DOTNUMBERMOTOR CARRIER NAMEPage 5, Guide to Minnesota Crash Data Files

TABLE 2: CRASH DATA FIELDS(in alphabetical sequence by data field name)CRASH FILEVEHICLE FILEPERSON C148C139C144C114C115C111C132 MINACCTYPEAMENDEDAT INTERSEC-TION WITHCITY / TWPCITY / TWP NAMECOUNTYDAMAGED PROPERTYDESCRIPTIONDAMAGED UNINT ELEMINT RELLIGHTLOC OF CRASH/WZLOCAL CASE NOLOCATION FHEMI / FTMILITARY TIMEMONTHN/S/E/WNARRATIVENUM INJUREDNUM KILLEDNUM VEHICLESOFFICER BADGE #OFFICER NAMEOFFICER RANKOFFICER TYPEON BRIDGEPATROL DIST/ STATIONPHOTOS TAKENPUB PROPRDCHARRDESGNRDSURFREFERENCE POINTROADWAY DIRECTIONROUTE #, STREET, CORPLIMIT, .ROUTE NUM / STREETNAMEROUTE SYSTEM 1ROUTE SYSTEM 2SCHLBUSSKETCHSPEED LIMITTYPE WZWEATHER 1WEATHER 2WORKERS PRESENTWORKINGX COORDINATEY COORDINATEYEARYELLOW TAG V108V126V114V132V133V138V119V123V109ADDRESSBADGE #CARGO BDY TYPECITYCOLORDIRECTDMG LOCDMG SEVFACTOR1FACTOR2FIREFIRST EVENTFOURTH EVENTHAZ MAT PLACINSPECTION #INSURANCELOCAL CASE NOMAKEMANEUVERMODELMOST HARM EVENTMOTOR CARRIER DOTNUMBERMOTOR CARRIER NAMEOCCUPOWNER FIRST NAMEOWNER LAST NAMEOWNER MIDDLE NAMEPLATE #POLICY NUMBERPULLING UNITRVN: RELATIVE VEHICLENUMBERSECOND EVENTST REGSTATETHIRD EVENTTOWVEH TYPEVEH USEWAIVEDYEARYEAR REGZIP DRESSADDRESS CORRECTAGEAIRBAGALC TSTAMBULANCE SERVICECITYDATE OF BIRTHDL CLASSDL NUMBERDL STATEDL STATUSDR TSTDR VIOLATIONEJECTENDORSE-MENTSFIRST NAMEINJ SEVLAST NAMELOCAL CASE NOMIDDLE NAMEPHYSCLPOSITIONRCOMNDRESTRICRPN: RELATIVE PERSONNUMBERRUN NUMBERRVN: RELATIVE VEHICLENUMBERSAFE EQPT TYPESAFE EQPT USESEXSTATETO HOSPTRANSPORTTYPE OF ALC TESTTYPE OF DRUG TESTZIP CODEPage 6, Guide to Minnesota Crash Data Files

TABLE 3: THE CRASH FILETABLE 3: THE CRASH FILE (C101 -- C158)NumberField NameAdditional DescriptionType /SizeValid Values / RulesC101 -- C113: Crash-l