BIRTH & BABIES FOR FIRST TIME PARENTS

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BIRTH & BABIESFOR FIRST TIME PARENTSthewomensthe royal women's hospitalvictoria australia

CHILDBIRTH EDUCATION AT THE WOMEN’SBIRTH & BABIES FOR FIRST TIME PARENTSINTRODUCTION . 3LEARNING ABOUT YOUR BABY . 4HOW BABIES COMMUNICATE . 4YOUR BABY’S SENSES AT BIRTH AND IN THE FIRST WEEKS . 4PRIOR TO LABOUR . 6THE PELVIC FLOOR . 6LATE PREGNANCY . 6ALL ABOUT LABOUR . 7THE PROCESS OF LABOUR . 7STAGE ONE (EARLY LABOUR 0-4 CENTRIMETRES DILATED) . 7STAGE ONE (ACTIVE LABOUR 4-8 CENTIMETRES DILATED) . 8STAGE ONE (TRANSITION 8-10 CENTIMETRES DILATED) . 8STAGE TWO (PUSHING) . 8STAGE THREE (THE PLACENTA). 8SUPPORTING YOU THROUGH LABOUR . 9THE CONCEPT OF PAIN . 9HORMONES THAT IMPACT LABOUR . 9SUPPORT IN LABOUR . 10IDEAS FOR ASSISTING THE LABOUR PROCESS . 10INFORMED CONSENT & PAIN MANAGEMENT . 11INFORMED CONSENT AND INFORMED DECISION-MAKING. 11MEDICAL PAIN MANAGEMENT OPTIONS AT THE WOMEN’S . 11VARIATIONS TO SPONTANEOUS LABOUR. 13INDUCTION OF LABOUR . 13AUGMENTATION OF LABOUR . 13ASSISTED BIRTH . 13FORCEPS BIRTH . 14CAESAREAN BIRTH . 14AFTER YOUR BABY IS BORN. 15IMPORTANT THINGS TO KNOW ABOUT YOUR STAY AT THE WOMEN’S . 15CARE IN HOSPITAL AFTER YOUR BABY IS BORN . 16POSTNATAL RECOVERY STRATEGIES . 17POSTNATAL EMOTIONS AND PSYCHOLOGICAL HEALTH . 17CARING FOR YOUR BABY. 18TESTS AND IMMUNISATIONS . 18INFANT STATES OF AWARENESS . 18BABY CRYING AND SETTLING . 19SAFETY . 19

CHILDBIRTH EDUCATION AT THE WOMEN’S – ONLINE EDUCATION PROGRAMBREASTFEEDING . 21ROOMING IN . 21WHY BREASTFEED? . 21HOW OFTEN SHOULD A YOUNG BABY FEED?. 22POSITIONING AND ATTACHMENT. 22HOW TO KNOW YOUR BABY IS FEEDING WELL AND GETTING ENOUGH MILK . 22ADVICE REGARDING THE USE OF TEATS/DUMMIES . 22EXPRESSING . 22HOSPITAL & COMMUNITY SUPPORTS. 23BIRTH & BABIES FOR FIRST TIME PARENTS – JUNE 2020PAGE 2

CHILDBIRTH EDUCATION AT THE WOMEN’S – ONLINE EDUCATION PROGRAMINTRODUCTIONThe information in this booklet relates to childbirthand early parenting education for women birthing atthe Royal Women's Hospital. This information isdesigned to enhance and support our online childbirtheducation program available atwww.thewomens.org.au/patients-visitors/cbe/For additional information about the following topics,please refer to the handbook Having Your Baby at theWomen’s available online ts#hYou can also find information about pregnancy andbirth on the Women’s website -and-birthPlease note that this is general information andremember that care will be individualised according toyour needs, and changing medical issues.Although this information has been designed primarilyfor singleton pregnancies, woman expecting two ormore babies will also find most of this informationvaluable.The Women’s respects the inherent dignity, worth,unique attributes and human rights of allindividuals. In this document the pregnant or birthperson will be referred to as the pregnant or birthwoman or mother and the partner or supportperson will be referred to as the support person.It is important to remember that as a patient, youhave rights and responsibilities – and the Women’swill respect and encourage your participation in yourcare. Being involved in decision-making is important,and communicating your thoughts and needs to yoursupport person and your care team is just one step inthat journey. onsibilitiesIf you have further questions about anything in thisbooklet, you can chat with a midwife or obstetrician atyour appointments with us; see your GP; or contactthe Childbirth Education team [email protected], the educational information provided is thesame for both the Parkville and Sandringhamcampuses, however when there is a significantdifference, this will be mentioned where relevant.Take a virtual hospital tour of the Women’sParkville ildbirtheducation-parkville-videotourAbout when to come to hospitalWhen to call:www.youtube.com/watch?v V5fKxv8mx2UWhere to arrive:www.youtube.com/watch?v 6aDoOXnmG7oBIRTH & BABIES FOR FIRST TIME PARENTS – JUNE 2020Disclaimer: The Women’s does not accept any liability to any personfor the information or advice (or use of such information or advice)which is provided in this Module or incorporated into it by reference.The Women’s provide this information on the understanding that allpersons accessing it take responsibility for assessing its relevanceand accuracy. Women are encouraged to discuss their health needswith a health practitioner. If you have concerns about your health,you should seek advice from your health care provider or if yourequire urgent care you should go to the nearest Emergency Dept. The Royal Women’s Hospital 2020PAGE 3

CHILDBIRTH EDUCATION AT THE WOMEN’S – ONLINE EDUCATION PROGRAMLEARNING ABOUT YOUR BABYApart from you – the pregnant woman – one otherperson is physically present throughout yourpregnancy: your baby. Many new families in today’ssociety have little previous experience caring forbabies before they become parents, therefore, it’simportant to understand the behaviours and needs ofbabies.This can also help you have a better understanding ofthe consequences of some of your choices.Just like the impact of choices made about smoking,alcohol and diet during pregnancy can have positiveor negative effects on your baby's growth. Similarly,choices made during labour, birth and the earlypostnatal period can have positive or negative effectson your baby's physical and psychologicaldevelopment.Here we begin to look at how babies communicateand their brain development.Your baby’s senses at birth and in thefirst weeksSightAt birth babies can see within cuddle or breastfeedingrange and are: attracted to black and white. Contrasting shades andcolour vision develop over the next few weeks andmonths able to gaze for periods of time immediately afterbirth drawn to human faces more than anything else andcan distinguish between a happy and sad face. Yourface is your baby’s best toy more likely to engage with an animated or movingface – we call this ‘mutual gaze’, it aids with theirbrain development. Tracking and mutual gaze oftenleads to your baby responding to your actions.HearingHow babies communicateDuring pregnancy and after your baby is born, babiesunderstand their world through the information theyreceive via their five senses. In fact, this is the mostdeveloped part of the brain at birth.Situations that cause stress to you, can also causestress for your baby.By understanding and watching your baby, you canlearn to decode their messages and betterunderstand their needs. Being able to understandand communicate with your baby helps theirdevelopment, aids bonding and supports further braindevelopment. Hearing is the most developed sense at birth and willcontinue to develop. Your voice is the most familiar. We recommend yoursupport person or partner spend considerable timespeaking with you before the birth so their voices willalso become familiar to the baby. Babies are drawn towards sounds, especiallyrhythmic or repetitive sounds. Lullabies, soothingvoices and gentle sounds may com