Commentary On Ephesians 1-2

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Commentary on Ephesians 1-2

by Thomas GoodwinTable of ContentsGENERAL PREFACEORIGINAL PREFACEPUBLISHER'S ADVERTISEMENTA PREMISE CONCERNING THIS EPISTLESERMON I.—EPHESIANS I. 1, 2SERMON II.—EPHESIANS I. 3SERMON III.—EPHESIANS I. 3SERMON IV.—EPHESIANS I. 3SERMON V.—EPHESIANS I. 4, 5,SERMON VI.—EPHESIANS I. 5, 6SERMON VII.—EPHESIANS I. 5, 6SERMON VIII.—EPHESIANS I. 7SERMON IX.—EPHESIANS I. 8, 9SERMON X.—EPHESIANS I. 10SERMON XI.—EPHESIANS I. 10SERMON XII.—EPHESIANS I. 10SERMON XIII.—EPHESIANS I. 11–14

SERMON XIV.—EPHESIANS I. 11–14SERMON XV.—EPHESIANS I. 13, 14SERMON XVI.—EPHESIANS I. 13, 14SERMON XVII.—EPHESIANS I. 14SERMON XVIII.—EPHESIANS I. 15, 16SERMON XIX.—EPHESIANS I. 17SERMON XX.—EPHESIANS I. 18SERMON XXI.—EPHESIANS I. 18SERMON XXII.—EPHESIANS I. 19, 20SERMON XXIII.—EPHESIANS I. 19, 20SERMON XXIV.—EPHESIANS I. 19, 20SERMON XXV.—EPHESIANS I. 19, 20SERMON XXVI.—EPHESIANS I. 19, 20SERMON XXVII.—EPHESIANS I. 19, 20SERMON XXVIII.—EPHESIANS I. 19, 20SERMON XXIX.—EPHESIANS I. 19, 20SERMON XXX.—EPHESIANS I. 20SERMON XXXI.—EPHESIANS I. 20, 21SERMON XXXII.—EPHESIANS I. 21, 22SERMON XXXIII.—EPHESIANS I. 21, 22

SERMON XXXIV.—EPHESIANS I. 21–23SERMON XXXV.—EPHESIANS I. 22, 23SERMON XXXVI.—EPHESIANS I. 22, 23AN EXPOSITION OF THE SECOND CHAPTERSERMON XXXVII.— EPHESIANS 2: 1–10SERMON XXXVIII—EPHESIANS 2. 1, 2, &c.SERMON XXXIX —EPHESIANS 2. 2SERMON XL.—EPHESIANS 2 2SERMON XLI.—EPHESIANS 2 3SERMON XLII.—EPHESIANS 2 3SERMON XLIII.—EPHESIANS 2 3SERMON XLIV.—EPHESIANS 2 3SERMON XLV.—EPHESIANS 2 3SERMON XLVI.—EPHESIANS 2 4–6SERMON XLVII.—EPHESIANS 2 4–6SERMON XLVIII.—EPHESIANS 2 4–6SERMON XLIX.—EPHESIANS 2 4–6SERMON L.—EPHESIANS 2 5, 6SERMON LI.—EPHESIANS 2 5SERMON LII.—EPHESIANS 2 6

SERMON LIII.—EPHESIANS 2 6SERMON LIV.—EPHESIANS 2 7SERMON LV.—EPHESIANS 2 7SERMON LVI.—EPHESIANS 2 7SERMON LVII.—EPHESIANS 2 8–10SERMON LVIII.—EPHESIANS 2 8–10SERMON LIX.—EPHESIANS 2 8–10SERMON LX.—EPHESIANS 2 11BONUS SERMON #1 - A SERMON ON EPHESIANS. 2:14–16—PART IBONUS SERMON #2 - A SERMON ON EPHESIANS. 2:14–16—PART IIBONUS SERMON #3 - A SERMON ON EPHESIANS. 3:17BONUS SERMON #4 - THE SECOND SERMON ON EPHESIANS. 3:16–21BONUS SERMONS #5 - A SERMON ON EPHESIANS. 5:30–32GENERAL PREFACEBY JOHN C. MILLER, D.D.,LINCOLN COLLEGE, OXFORD; HONORARYCANON OF WORCESTER; RECTOR OF ST

MARTIN'S, BIRMINGHAM.THE stores of theology, enriched by the accumulating treasures ofsuccessive generations, have of late years been thrown open widely to theChurch of Christ. The Fathers, the Reformers, many of the great Puritanwriters, no less than the later theologians of the Church of England and ofthe Nonconformist Churches, have been issued in a form and at a pricewhich places them within general reach. In the departments ofHermeneutics and Exegetics, more especially, these stores are receivingconstant and, with more or less of the alloy of human imperfection anderror, most valuable additions. Among English scholars, the labours ofProfessor Ellicott, who, in philological acumen and attainments of thehighest order, in combination with an absence of party bias, and with aprofound reverence for the inspiration and authority of the SacredScriptures, is a very model of scholarship, sanctified to the honest andfearless interpretation of God's Word,—trusting Scripture, and anxiousonly to educe its meaning, to whatever conclusions it may lead; DeanAlford and Dr Wordsworth, in their great works; Dean Trench, Dr Peile,Professor Eadie, Dr Vaughan (whose unpretending Exposition of theEpistle to the Romans is sufficiently indicative of many of thequalifications of an expositor); Messrs Conybeare and Howson, in theirwell-known work; Dr Henderson on the Prophets; in America, ProfessorStuart, with all his faults, and (though not as a philological scholar, yet asa sober, copious, and painstaking expositor) Albert Barnes,—have givento the Church κτήματα ἐς ἀεί.*Nor must our obligations to modern German theologians be forgotten.Their works, the best of them, need to be read with discrimination. Andin those which have been brought within reach of the English student,some of which are deservedly in high esteem, there is even in the best,with scarcely an exception, not only much that is prolix and wearisome,but, specially to those of us who read them under the disadvantage of atranslation, much that is misty, and not a little that is questionable. Theseare within our reach, and much used by many of our clergy and ministers.No theological library can be complete without them. To the student andto the preacher they are storehouses with which they can ill afford todispense, if they are to be as scribes well "instructed unto the kingdom of

heaven," bringing "forth out of" their "treasure things new and old."For although there is something specious in the notion that the preachercan afford to be a man of one book, if that book be the Book of God,—andwe doubt not that such men have been, and will be yet again, blessed togreat usefulness in the Church of Christ,—it involves surely a blind andungrateful misappreciation and disparagement of the gifts dispensed bythat Divine Spirit whose "manifestation" is "given to every man to profitwithal," when we underrate the treasures which, have been left to us bymen raised from time to time for the close study and investigation of thewritten Word, and for the enforcement and defence of the doctrines ofour "most holy faith." Individual cases of "unlearned and ignorant men,"lacking apostolic inspiration and endowments, may arise not seldom, inwhich, with humble gifts, and little or none of the assistance of humanlore and training, they have been signally owned and honoured by God todo His work in the ingathering and edification of His people. But, as arule, an ignorant clergy, a clergy undisciplined by habits of study anduninformed by reading, will fail to be effective in an enlightened andinquiring age. Their preaching will be vapid, superficial, and desultory,ultimately settling down into an iteration (fluent enough perhaps) offacile topics.These remarks apply with peculiar force to a crisis in the Church's historyin which heresy is rife, and the foundations of the faith are underminedand assailed by formidable errors. The Church then needs well-equippedchampions. Such can be found only among well-stored theologians,theologians "mighty in the Scriptures," but well versed also in the worksof the great and gifted champions and exponents of the faith in every age—the Fathers and Reformers of old, and the later and the livingcontributors to the Church's stores.Among these stores, it will not be denied that the writings of the PuritanDivines must ever be held in high estimation. Many of them are, inextenso, within our reach, widely circulated, and largely used; as BishopHopkins, Owen, Baxter, Howe, Bates, Flavel, &c. &c. Others, such as areto be published in this Series, are generally accessible in select worksonly; as Manton, Goodwin, Sibbes, Brooks, Charnock, Adams, &c. Theworks of the first four of these have never been published in a uniform

edition; and of the works of Sibbes and Brooks, no complete collectionexists in any public library of the kingdom, and probably in few, if in any,of the private libraries is a full set of either to be found.The projector of the present scheme—a scheme to be followed up, shouldits success realise the expectations formed of it, by the issue of the worksof Trapp, Swinnock, Gilpin, Trail, Bates, Burgess, and others which havebeen suggested—is conferring a great boon upon the Church of Christ,and one the influence of which may be felt throughout the Protestantpulpits of Christendom; by doing for the comparatively inaccessibleworks of these Puritan Divines what has been done for many of theFathers, the Reformers, and the German Theologians, in collecting theirworks, and issuing them in a form and at a price which will place them onthe shelves of thousands of our students and ministers, at home, in thecolonies, and in the United States of America.It would obviously be beyond the scope of this preface to enlarge uponthe history of the Puritans, interwoven as it is with stirring events andtimes, more familiar to us probably than any others in the annals ofEngland. From Bishop Hooper, down to the disastrous ejectment of 1662,their story has been often told. By none with greater candour, with moreenlarged catholicity of spirit, or with more graceful diction, than by thehistorian of the Early and Later Puritans, the Rev. J. B. Marsden, in hisstandard volumes:—"Wherever the religion, the language, or the free spirit of our country hasforced its way, the Puritans of old have some memorial. They havemoulded the character and shaped the laws of other lands, and tingedwith their devouter shades unnumbered congregations of Christianworshippers, even where no allegiance is professed, or willing homagedone to their peculiarities. It is a party that has numbered in its ranksmany of the best, and not a few of the greatest men that England hasenrolled upon her history. Amongst the Puritans were found, togetherwith a crowd of our greatest divines, and a multitude of learned men,many of our most profound lawyers, some of our most able statesmen, ofour most renowned soldiers, and (strangely out of place as they mayseem) not a few of our greatest orators and poets. Smith and Owen,Baxter and Howe, were their ministers, and preached amongst them.

Cecil revered and defended them while he lived; so did the illustriousBacon; and the unfortunate Essex sought his consolations from themwhen he came to die."*Mixed up as were the Puritans with keen and long-continuedcontroversies, both political and religious, they have left behind them avast mass of theology,—not controversial, but expository and hortatory,—which is the common property of the Church of Christ, and whichEpiscopalians and Presbyterians and Wesleyans, Independents andBaptists, may alike appreciate, use, and enjoy. Their works, developingand embodying the theology of the Reformation, form a department inour theological literature, and occupy a place so specific and important,that their absence from the student's shelves can be compensated neitherby Fathers nor Reformers, nor by the richest stores of modern divinity,whether English or Continental.They have ever been subjects of eulogy with those best acquainted withthem. The gustus spiritualis judicii predicated of Goodwin by his editors,"Thankful Owen," and "James Barron,"—the "genius to dive into thebottom of points," and "to study them down,"—"the happiness of highand intimate communion with God,"—the "deep insight into the grace ofGod and the covenant of grace,"—these are characteristic of the wholeschool; and, in an eminent degree, of those whose works have beenselected for this Series. Of Manton writes the "silver-tongued Bates:"—"God had furnished him with a rare union of those parts that are requisiteto form an excellent minister of His Word. A clear judgment, rich fancy,strong memory, and happy elocution, met in him, and were excellentlyimproved by his diligent study."". In the performing this work he was of that conspicuous eminencethat none could detract from him, but from ignorance or envy."He was endowed with extraordinary knowledge in the Scriptures, thoseholy oracles from whence all spiritual light is derived; and in hispreaching gave such a perspicuous account of the order and dependenceof divine truths, and with that felicity applied the Scriptures to confirmthem, that every subject by his management was cultivated and

improved. His discourses were so clear and convincing, that none,without offering voluntary violence to conscience, could resist theirevidence. And from hence they were effectual, not only to inspire asudden flame, and raise a short commotion in the affections, but to makea lasting change in the life.""His doctrine was uncorrupt and pure; 'the truth according to goodness.'He was far from a guilty vile intention to prostitute that sacred ordinancefor the acquiring any private secular advantage. Neither did he entertainhis hearers with impertinent subtleties, empty notions, intricate disputes,dry and barren, without productive virtue; but as one that always hadbefore his eyes the great end of the ministry, the glory of God and thesalvation of men, his sermons were directed to open their eyes, that theymight see their wretched condition as sinners, to hasten their 'flight fromthe wrath to come,' to make them humbly, thankfully, and entirely'receive Christ as their Prince and all-sufficient Saviour.' And to build upthe converted 'in their most holy faith,' and more excellent love, that is'the fulfilling of the law.' In short, to make true Christians eminent inknowledge and universal obedience."As the matter of his sermons was designed for the good of souls, so hisway of expression was proper to that end. Words are the vehicle of theheavenly light. As the Divine Wisdom was incarnate to reveal the eternalcounsels of God to the world, so spiritual wisdom in the mind must beclothed with words to make it sensible to others. And in this he had asingular talent. His style was not exquisitely studied, not consisting ofharmonious periods, but far distant from vulgar meanness. Hisexpression was natural and free, clear and eloquent, quick and powerful,without any spice of folly, and always suitable to the simplicity andmajesty of divine truths. His sermons afforded substantial food withdelight, so that a fastidious mind could mot disrelish them. He abhorreda vain ostentation of wit in handling sacred things, so venerable andgrave, and of eternal consequence,""His fervour and earnestness in preaching was such as might soften andmake pliant the most stubborn, obdurate spirits. I am not speaking of onewhose talent was only in voice, that labours in the pulpit as if the end ofpreaching were for the exercise of the body, and not for the profit of

souls; but this man of God was inflamed with a. holy zea