Microsoft Word 2016 Basic Authoring And Testing Guide

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Microsoft Word 2016Basic Authoring andTesting GuideSection 508 Accessibility GuidanceAccessible Electronic Document Community ofPractice (AED COP)October 2018

ContentsDocument Formatting . 21. Is the file name descriptive, is the file in the .docx format, and is the file not protected? . 2Text Formatting. 42.3.4.5.6.7.Do document headings use the MS Word heading styles? . 4Are lists formatted correctly? . 5Are columns of content formatted correctly? . 6Are layout tables formatted correctly? . 8Is text formatted for the intended language? . 9Are link names descriptive? . 11Object Formatting . 128. Is vital information in headers, footers, and watermarks duplicated in the document? . 129. Did you use built-in features to create data tables? . 1210. Do images and other objects have alternative text? . 1511. Are images, objects, and text boxes in line with the text? . 16Color Formatting . 1712. Are colors and other visual characteristics that convey informationalso described with text? . 1713. Is the contrast ratio between text and background sufficient? . 18Miscellaneous . 2014. Are there corresponding descriptions of your embedded files and are they accurate? . 2015. Did you avoid forms while using MS Word 2016? . 2116. Did you exclude flashing objects? . 21Index of Figures . 22Index of Tables . 22Microsoft Word 2016 Basic Authoring and Testing GuidePage 1

Microsoft Word 2016Basic Authoring and Testing GuideDocument Formatting1.Is the file name descriptive, is the file in the .docx format, and isthe file not protected?How to testInstruction 1: Look at the filename in Windows Explorer or the title bar in MS Word. Anexample of a non-descriptive file name is “Document1.” An example of a descriptive filename is“MSWord Checklist.” The file must be in the “*.docx” format for accessibility testing to bepossible.Note: If the file name extension is not displayed, open your documents folder in WindowsExplorer, select “View” and enable the checkmark for “File name extensions.”Figure 1: “Save As” options windowTest A: Is the filename descriptive and does it identify the document or its purpose? If not, thedocument fails this test.Test B: Is the file in “Word Document (.docx)” format? If not, the document fails this test.Instruction 2: Select the “Review tab Restrict Editing” and look to see if the “Stop Protection”button appears at the bottom of the “Restrict Editing” pane. If the “Restrict Editing” pane showsoptions 1, 2, and 3, then restricted editing is turned off. Document protections limit the ability totest for accessibility and can make portions or the entire document inaccessible.Microsoft Word 2016 Basic Authoring and Testing GuidePage 2

Figure 2: Restrict Editing pane options and protected enabled viewsTest C: Does the “Restrict Editing” pane show options 1, 2, and 3? If not, the document fails thistest.How to author for accessibilityA descriptive filename that identifies the document or its purpose helps everyone (includingpeople with disabilities) locate, open, and switch between documents. In addition, the documentmust be in a “.docx” format because these authoring and testing instructions will only work if thefile is in the “.docx” file format. Document restrictions limit or prevent users of assistivetechnology from reading or editing the document. If you must use document restrictions, turnthem off during testing and then ensure assistive technology users have access to the password.Select “File tab Save As” Save as type: “Word Document (*.docx)”.Save the document with a descriptive filename.Microsoft Word 2016 Basic Authoring and Testing GuidePage 3

Text Formatting2.Do document headings use the MS Word heading styles?How to testInstruction: Open the “Navigation pane (Ctrl F)” and select the “Headings” tab.Test A: Do the headings in the “Navigation pane” mirror the headings you see in the document?If not, the document fails this test.Test B: Do the headings you see in the “Navigation pane” match the visual outline of yourdocument (i.e. the same hierarchy)? If not, the document fails this test.Figure 3: Matching headings displayed in Navigation Pane and documentHow to author for accessibilityHeadings organize content and make finding information easier. Assistive technology cannot infermeaning if you just format the text (such as increased font size, bold, or underlined text).Heading styles create a structure that assistive technology can quickly access and aid documentnavigation based on the heading levels.Select “Home tab Styles” (or “Ctrl Alt Shift S” to open the “Styles pane”) and apply headingstyles to the headings in your document.Microsoft Word 2016 Basic Authoring and Testing GuidePage 4

Figure 4: Styles Pane and options window with Heading 1 Style selectedYou can: Select the heading style you want and then type your heading, orType your heading, place your cursor anywhere within the heading, and then select theheading style you want to use.If you have different heading levels (such as chapter, article, section, topic, etc.), then you mustuse a different style for each heading type. You can modify styles to create the look and feel youwant in your document.3.Are lists formatted correctly?How to testInstruction: Place your cursor on a list item. Open the “Reveal Formatting pane (Shift F1).”Figure 5: List option displayed under Bullets and NumberingTest: Is the “List” option visible under “Bullets and Numbering”? If not, the document fails thistest.Microsoft Word 2016 Basic Authoring and Testing GuidePage 5

How to author for accessibilityLists organize and structure content. Assistive technology users cannot infer meaning if you justformat with tabs, a dash, or a number. Using built-in list features applies the formatting thatassistive technology needs to both identify and present lists to users with disabilities.Select “Home tab Paragraph” and use the “Bullets,” “Numbering,” or “Multilevel List” featureswhen formatting lists in your document.To use the built-in list features, you can: Select the list feature you want and then type your list item, orType your list item and then select the list feature you want to use.Figure 6: Paragraph tab displaying options for bulleted, numbered and multilevel lists4.Are columns of content formatted correctly?How to testNote: If content does not appear in columns, you do not need to perform this test.Instruction: Place your cursor on content that appears to be formatted in columns (similar tohow a newspaper article will span multiple columns). Open the “Reveal Formatting pane(Shift F1)” and expand “Section” by selecting the arrow sign.Microsoft Word 2016 Basic Authoring and Testing GuidePage 6

Figure 7: Number of Columns displayed under Section Columns optionTest: Are “Columns:” listed under “Section?” If not, the document fails this test.How to author for accessibilityScreen readers and assistive technology cannot read information in the correct reading orderwhen using tabs or spaces to separate content into columns.Select “Layout tab Page Setup Columns” when creating columns in your document.Figure 8: Columns menu set to Two columns optionTo use the built-in column feature: Select content you want to format.Microsoft Word 2016 Basic Authoring and Testing GuidePage 7

5.Select “Columns.”Select the number of columns you want.Are layout tables formatted correctly?How to testInstruction 1: Layout tables arrange content on the page. Place your cursor on the first cell ofyour layout table. Use your “Tab” key to navigate through the table.Test A: Does the tab order match the visual layout? If not, the document fails this test.Instruction 2: “Right click” or “Shift F10” inside a layout table and select “TableProperties Text Wrapping.”Test B: Is “None” selected? If not, the document fails this test.Figure 9: Table Properties Table tab displaying Text wrapping set to “None”How to author for accessibilityLayout Tables create a structure that screen readers and assistive technology can use to readinformation in the correct order (left to right then top to bottom). If the table is formatted toallow text to wrap around the table, assistive technology users will have difficulty finding thewrapped text on the page.Microsoft Word 2016 Basic Authoring and Testing GuidePage 8

To create a table: Select “Insert tab Table”Select the desired number of columns and rows.Text wrapping is automatically set to “None.”Figure 10: Insert Table menu with a 4x3 table option selected6.Is text formatted for the intended language?How to testNote: If the document only uses one language, you do not have to perform this test.Instruction: If the document contains words or phrases in a language other than thepredominant language, place your cursor on that text. Open the “Reveal Formatting pane(Shift F1)” and look under “Language.”Microsoft Word 2016 Basic Authoring and Testing GuidePage 9

Figure 11: Korean Language displayed under Font Language formatting optionTest: Is the text formatted in the correct language? If not, the document fails this test.How to author for accessibilityA document can contain sections written in different languages. Assistive technology cannot inferthe correct pronunciation from just text, so text must be formatted in the correct language.Select “Review tab Language Set Proofing Language.”Figure 12: Language window with Korean language option selectedTo set a different language, you: Select text written in a different language.Select “Review tab Language Set Proofing Language.”Select the appropriate language from the list.Microsoft Word 2016 Basic Authoring and Testing GuidePage 10

7.Are link names descriptive?How to testTest: Do links have meaningful names that describe their destination, function, and/or purposeor are these determinable within context? If not, the document fails this test.Uniquely Named Link:www.section508.govLink Determinable within context:Get My Section 508 Questions AnsweredAn unclear link name with no context:click hereHow to author for accessibilityAssistive technology users rely on meaningful names to determine the destination, function, orpurpose of links. For example, multiple “click here” links confuse assistive technology usersbecause the name for each link is the same, while the destinations may be different.Naming and creating links: To edit the name of a link, place your cursor on the link and edit the text.Note: deleting the last character in the link name will remove the link.To create a hyperlink, select or type the hyperlink text and either right click and select“Hyperlink” or use “Ctrl K” to open the “Insert Hyperlink” configuration window.Specify/verify the “Text to display” and the “Address” for the link and its destination, andselect “OK.”Figure 13: Insert Hyperlink configuration windowMicrosoft Word 2016 Basic Authoring and Testing GuidePage 11

Object Formatting8.Is vital information in headers, footers, and watermarksduplicated in the document?How to testInstruction: Look for vital information in headers, footers, and watermarks (e.g. Respond by XDate, CONFIDENTIAL, or Do Not Distribute).Test: Is the vital information duplicated near the beginning of the document? If not, thedocument fails this test.How to author for accessibilityAssistive technology does not automatically read information in headers, footers, andwatermarks, so you need to duplicate any vital information at or near the start of the relatedinformation.Figure 14: Example of vital information in a header repeated in the body of the document9.Did you use built-in features to create data tables?How to testInstruction 1: Select a table and see if the “Picture Tools” tab shows up in the Ribbon insteadof the “Table Tools” tab. If the “Picture Tools” tab shows in the Ribbon, then the table is apicture.Test A: Is the document free of pictures of tables? If not, the document fails this test.Instruction 2: Place your cursor on a table, select “Table Tools Layout tab Table group ViewGridlines” button, and look for table cells that are merged or split.Microsoft Word 2016 Basic Authoring and Testing GuidePage 12

Test B: Are tables free of merged or split cells? If not, the document fails this test.Figure 15: Complex table with merged and