Tools For Transformation: Becoming Accessible, Culturally .

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Tools for Transformation:Becoming Accessible, Culturally Responsive,and Trauma-Informed OrganizationsAn Organizational Reflection ToolkitCarole Warshaw, MD, Erin Tinnon, MSW, LSW, and Cathy CaveApril 2018Youth and Families, Family and Youth Services Bureau, U.S. Department of Health and HumanServices. Points of view in this document are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflectNational Center on Domestic Violence, Trauma & Mental Health NCDVTMH 2018

Tools for Transformation:Becoming Accessible, Culturally Responsive, andTrauma-Informed OrganizationsAn Organizational Reflection ToolkitApril 2018Carole Warshaw, MD, Erin Tinnon, MSW, LSW, and Cathy CaveProduced by the National Center on Domestic Violence, Trauma & Mental HealthThis publication is supported by Grant # 90EV0437-01-00 from the Administration on Children, Youth andFamilies, Family and Youth Services Bureau, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Points of viewin this document are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the official positions or policies ofthe U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. 201 8 N ATI ON A L CEN TER ON DOMESTIC VIOLEN CE, TRA UMA & MEN TA L HEA LTH1

BECOM ING ACCES SI BLE , CULT URA LL Y R ES PONS IV E , AND TRAUM A- I NFORM E D ORG ANIZ ATI O NSThe National Center on Domestic Violence, Trauma & Mental Health (NCDVTMH) is one offour Special Issue Resource Centers funded by the U.S. Department of Health and HumanServices Administration on Children and Families, Family Violence Prevention and ServicesProgram. NCDVTMH’s mission is to develop and promote accessible, culturally relevant,and trauma-informed responses to domestic violence and other lifetime trauma so thatsurvivors and their children can access the resources that are essential to their safety andwell-being. Our work is survivor defined and rooted in principles of social justice.NCDVTMH provides a comprehensive array of training, consultation and resources tosupport domestic violence and sexual assault advocates and their partners in the health,mental health, substance abuse, legal and child welfare fields as well as policymakers andgovernment officials in improving agency and system responses to survivors of domesticviolence and other trauma.For more information, see WWW.NATIONALCENTERDVTRAUMAMH.ORGAcknowledgementsWe are grateful to Juliana Pino, MPP, MS for her design and editing expertise, to HeatherPhillips, MA for her editing and fine-tuning, to Jen Curley, MSS, MLSP and Terri Pease, PhDfor all of their work on earlier versions of this document, and to Rachel White-Domain, JDand Susan Blumenfeld, MSW, LCSW for their reviews of this Toolkit. 201 8 N ATI ON A L CEN TER ON DOMESTIC VIOLEN CE, TRA UMA & MEN TA L HEA LTH2

BECOM ING ACCES SI BLE , CULT URA LL Y RE SPONSI V E , AND TRA UM A- I NFORM E D ORG ANIZ ATI O NSTable of ContentsTABLE OF CONTENTS. 3INTRODUCTION . 5CRITICAL CONCEPTS FOR ENGAGING IN A PROCESS OF SELF-REFLECTION AND ORGANIZATIONAL CHANGE . 6THE FORMAT OF THIS TOOLKIT . 10HOW TO USE THIS TOOL . 11BEFORE YOU GET STARTED . 12FOCUS AREA 1: ORGANIZATIONAL COMMITMENT AND INFRASTRUCTURE . 15POLICIES THAT REFLECT MISSION, VISION, AND VALUES . 16HUMAN RESOURCES POLICIES AND PRACTICES . 16FINANCES AND RESOURCE ALLOCATION . 17TRAINING POLICIES AND PRACTICES . 17POLICIES AND PRACTICES THAT SUPPORT PROGRAM PARTICIPANTS . 18FOCUS AREA 2: STAFF SUPPORT AND SUPERVISION . 19POLICIES AND PROCEDURES . 20SUPERVISION AND PRACTICE. 21FOCUS AREA 3: PHYSICAL, SENSORY, AND RELATIONAL ENVIRONMENTS . 22INDICATORS OF ACCESSIBILITY IN PRACTICE . 24INDICATORS OF CULTURAL RESPONSIVENESS IN PRACTICE . 24INDICATORS OF TRAUMA-INFORMED PRACTICE . 25FOCUS AREA 4: INTAKE PROCESS . 27INDICATORS OF ACCESSIBILITY IN PRACTICE . 28INDICATORS OF CULTURAL RESPONSIVENESS IN PRACTICE . 29INDICATORS OF TRAUMA-INFORMED PRACTICE . 30FOCUS AREA 5: PROGRAMS AND SERVICES . 31INDICATORS OF ACCESSIBILITY IN PRACTICE . 32INDICATORS OF CULTURAL RESPONSIVENESS IN PRACTICE . 33INDICATORS OF TRAUMA-INFORMED PRACTICE . 33 201 8 N ATI ON A L CEN TER ON DOMESTIC VIOLEN CE, TRA UMA & MEN TA L HEA LTH3

BECOM ING ACCES SI BLE , CULT URA LL Y RE SPONSI V E , AND TRA UM A- I NFORM E D ORG ANIZ ATI O NSTable of Contents, continuedFOCUS AREA 6: COMMUNITY PARTNERSHIPS . 35POLICIES AND AGREEMENTS . 36TRAINING AND PRACTICE . 36FOCUS AREA 7: FEEDBACK AND EVALUATION . 38GATHERING AND IMPLEMENTATION . 39KEY EVALUATION TOPICS AND THEMES . 39APPENDIX A: GLOSSARY OF KEY TERMS TO SUPPORT UNDERSTANDING FOR ACCESSIBLE, CULTURALLYRESPONSIVE, TRAUMA-INFORMED WORK . 41APPENDIX B: CREATING TRAUMA-INFORMED SERVICES AND ORGANIZATIONS: AN INTEGRATEDAPPROACH . 51INTRODUCTION . 51KEY PERSPECTIVES AND CORE PRINCIPLES FOR ENGAGING IN ACCESSIBLE, CULTURALLY RESPONSIVE, AND TRAUMA-INFORMEDWORK . 52APPENDIX C: ADDITIONAL RESOURCES FOR YOUR PROCESS OF TRANSFORMATION . 56CITATIONS . 56ADDITIONAL MATERIALS FROM NATIONAL CENTER ON DOMESTIC VIOLENCE, TRAUMA & MENTAL HEALTH. 57ADDITIONAL RESOURCE . 57APPENDIX D: GETTING CONCRETE: CHANGE IN REAL TIME WORKSHEETS TO SUPPORT ORGANIZATIONALCHANGE. 59WORKSHEET – FOCUS AREA 1: ORGANIZATIONAL COMMITMENT AND INFRASTRUCTURE . 59WORKSHEET – FOCUS AREA 2: STAFF SUPPORT AND SUPERVISION . 60WORKSHEET – FOCUS AREA 3: PHYSICAL, SENSORY, AND RELATIONAL ENVIRONMENTS . 61WORKSHEET – FOCUS AREA 4: INTAKE PROCESS . 62WORKSHEET – FOCUS AREA 5: PROGRAMS AND SERVICES . 63WORKSHEET – FOCUS AREA 6: COMMUNITY PARTNERSHIPS . 64WORKSHEET – FOCUS AREA 7: FEEDBACK AND EVALUATION . 65 201 8 N ATI ON A L CEN TER ON DOMESTIC VIOLEN CE, TRA UMA & MEN TA L HEA LTH4

BECOM ING ACCES SI BLE , CULT URA LL Y RE SPONSI V E , AND TRA UM A- I NFORM E D ORG ANIZ ATI O NSSECTION 1: PREPARING TO USE THE TOOLIntroductionWe want to thank you for embarking on this journey of transformation and hope this Toolkitprovides meaningful guidance and structure.The National Center on Domestic Violence, Trauma & Mental Health (NCDVTMH) has designed thisTool for organizations serving survivors of domestic and sexual violence and their children. Its purpose isto support organizations in their efforts to become more accessible, culturally responsive, and traumainformed (ACRTI) in their approach and services. NCDVTMH’s framework for supporting the developmentof ACRTI services and organizations draws from a number of different perspectives - from the voices andexperiences of survivors, advocates, and clinicians; from the insights of social and political movements;and from research and science, including a growing body of research on child development andneurobiology.Initially developed as a way to bridge trauma-informed and advocacy perspectives, this approachis grounded in domestic and sexual violence advocacy; incorporates an understanding of trauma and itseffects; creates accessible environments for healing; recognizes the centrality of culture; attends to thewell-being of staff, organizations, and communities; and is committed to social justice and human rights.The core principles of ACRTI work - physical and emotional safety, hope and resilience, relationship andconnection, and a survivor-defined approach - provide a foundation for creating services that arewelcoming and inclusive, attuned to the range of people’s experiences, and relevant to the people andcommunities we serve.The new and revised version of our 2012 Accessible, Culturally Responsive, Domestic Violence-,and Trauma-Informed Tool includes expanded sections on accessibility, cultural responsiveness andinclusion, and on collaboration with community partners such as health, mental health, substance abuse,peer support, child welfare, and other child- and family-serving systems and agencies. It also intentionallyrecognizes services for children, youth, and families as an integral part of trauma-informed domestic andsexual violence advocacy. Thus, in this version, the term “survivor” is used to refer to adults, adults andtheir children, youth, young adults, elders, and anyone in the family system – as defined by survivors –who have experienced or witnessed violence. The term “partner,” is used to refer to a current or former 201 8 N ATI ON A L CEN TER ON DOMESTIC VIOLEN CE, TRA UMA & MEN TA L HEA LTH5

BECOM ING ACCES SI BLE , CULT URA LL Y RE SPONSI V E , AND TRA UM A- I NFORM E D ORG ANIZ ATI O NSspouse, someone a person is dating, a person’s sexual partners, and/or someone a person has asignificant emotional relationship with. In this document we alternate between using “survivor” and“participant” to describe the people engaging in our services.Critical Concepts for Engaging in a Process of Self-Reflectionand Organizational ChangeIn order to provide a foundation for understanding this document, we have defined some criticalterms for navigating this process of self-reflection and organizational change. You can find an expandedglossary of terms at the end of this Toolkit in Appendix A, which also includes many of the termsembedded in the following definitions. We believe it will be helpful to read Appendix B prior to engagingwith this material, as it covers NCDVTMH’s Integrated Approach to Creating Trauma-Informed Servicesand Organizations. The material contained in these appendices provides the framework for using theReflection Tool, itself.Defining ACRTIq The term accessible means that people with all kinds of abilities are able to fully access our agencies,including our info