Volume 107, No. 2 Usda.gov/oce/weather

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Volume 107, No. 2http://www.usda.gov/oce/weatherJanuary 14, 2020WEEKLY WEATHERAND CROP BULLETINU.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCENational Oceanic and Atmospheric AdministrationNational Weather ServiceHIGHLIGHTSJanuary 5 – 11, 2020DHighlights provided by USDA/WAOBuring the second half of the week, a winter stormproduced a variety of weather hazards—includingheavy precipitation (rain and snow), large-scale flooding,and severe thunderstorms—from eastern sections of thecentral and southern Plains to the Appalachians. Flashflooding and river flooding developed from the midSouth into the lower Great Lakes region, as heavy rainfell on already saturated soils. In fact, minor to moderateflooding unfolded across the middle Mississippi andlower Ohio Valleys. From January 10-12, thunderstorms(Continued on page 3)U.S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURENational Agricultural Statistics Serviceand World Agricultural Outlook BoardContentsExtreme Maximum & Minimum Temperature Maps . 2Temperature Departure Map . 3January 7 Drought Monitor & Snow Cover Map . 4National Weather Data for Selected Cities . 5December Weather Summary . 8December Precipitation & Temperature Maps . 12December Weather Data for Selected Cities . 15January 9 ENSO Update. 16International Weather and Crop Summary . 17Bulletin Information &U.S. Crop Production Highlights . 26

2Weekly Weather and Crop BulletinJanuary 14, 2020

January 14, 2020Weekly Weather and Crop Bulletin(Continued from front cover)sweeping across the southeastern Plainsand the Southeast produced widespreadwind damage and spawned isolatedtornadoes. Meanwhile, late-week snowblanketed areas from the southeasternPlains into the Great Lakes region, ascolder air supplanted record-settingwarmth. Despite the late-week coolingtrend,above-normaltemperaturesprevailed for the third consecutive weekacross the eastern half of the country.The core area of Eastern warmthstretched from the mid-South into thelower Great Lakes region, wherereadings averaged 10 to 15 F abovenormal.In contrast, temperaturesplunged below -20 F on the nights ofJanuary 7-8 and 10-11 from the RedRiver Valley into northern Minnesota.On the Plains, January 11 temperaturesbriefly dipped below 0 F as far south asnortheastern Colorado and thenorthwestern corner of Kansas.Elsewhere, mostly dry weather prevailedfrom the Southwest to the northern Plains and upper Midwest,while occasional rain and snow showers spread inland across thePacific Northwest and the northern Rockies.For much of the week, rather tranquil weather prevailed. Some heavyprecipitation fell, however, in western Washington, where dailyrecord totals for January 6 included 3.01 inches in Olympia and 2.57inches in Hoquiam. Weekly totals in those locations reached 5.75and 5.40 inches, respectively. Precipitation returned to theNorthwest on January 10, when Spokane, WA, received a dailyrecord snowfall of 7.0 inches. Meanwhile, heavy rain and severethunderstorms erupted across the southeastern Plains and swepteastward. Record-setting rainfall amounts for January 10 included3.82 inches in McAlester, OK; 3.63 inches in Springfield, MO; and3.27 inches in Fayetteville, AR. In Missouri, January 9-11precipitation totaled more than 4 inches—ending as accumulatingsnow—in locations such as Springfield (4.11 inches, with 1.1 inchesof snow) and St. Louis (4.33 inches, with 2.5 inches of snow). TheSouthern deluge continued through January 11, when daily-recordamounts topped the 3-inch mark in locations such as Stuttgart, AR(3.41 inches); Paducah, KY (3.09 inches); and Greenwood, MS(3.06 inches). From January 10-12, there were more than 700 reportsof wind damage and nearly five dozen tornadoes across the South,according to preliminary reports from the National Weather Service.Among the most significant tornadoes was an EF-2 twister (estimatedwinds in excess of 130 mph), which struck Pickens County, AL, onthe morning of January 11. That tornado, which cut a 6.3-mile swathand had a maximum width of more than 1,000 yards, resulted in threefatalities. Elsewhere on the 11th, heavy rain also expanded into thelower Great Lakes region, where daily-record amounts totaled 2.42inches in South Bend, IN, and 2.38 inches in Lansing, MI.Elsewhere in Michigan, totals on the 11th of 2.42 inches in Flint and2.06 inches in Detroit represented the highest January daily amountson record. Previous records had been 1.34 inches (on January 18,1949) in Flint and 1.76 inches (on January 12, 1908) in Detroit.3Warmth accompanied the early week storminess in the Northwest,where record-setting highs for January 6 included 59 F in Yakima,WA, and The Dalles, OR. On January 7, Troutdale, OR, alsonoted a daily-record high of 59 F. A few days later, warmth rapidlydeveloped across the central and eastern U.S. By January 9,daily-record highs surged to 66 F in Kansas City, MO, and 62 Fin Ottumwa, IA. On January 10-11, the week ended withconsecutive daily-record highs in locations such as Huntington,WV (68 and 78 F); Lexington, KY (67 and 75 F); and Cincinnati,OH (61 and 67 F). Other record-breaking highs for January 11included 87 F in Naples, FL; 80 F in Charleston, WV; and 70 Fin Cleveland, OH, and Boston, MA. Charleston had not attainedan 80-degree reading in January since January 15, 1932, when thehigh reached 81 F.Frigid, mostly dry weather persisted across the Alaskan mainlandand overspread the southeastern part of the state. On January 6-7,Kodiak posted consecutive daily-record lows (2 and -1 F,respectively). In McGrath, the temperature stayed continuouslybelow -15 F from January 2-11; the lowest reading during that timewas -51 F on the 9th. From January 3-12, Fairbanks’ lowtemperatures ranged from -33 to -43 F. In stark contrast, warmthoverspread the Aleutians, where Cold Bay notched a daily-recordhigh of 50 F on January 10. During the transition to colder weather,snow fell in southeastern Alaska; Juneau received 6.1 inches onJanuary 6-7. Farther south, warmth continued across Hawaii, whileheavy rain developed in many windward (and a few leeward)locations. On the Big Island, Hilo collected a daily record-tyinghigh of 87 F on January 10, accompanied by a daily-record rainfallof 3.21 inches. Hilo’s weekly rainfall reached 7.77 inches. Someof the Big Island’s heaviest rain fell on January 11-12, when 24hour totals included 21.84 inches at Saddle Quarry and 20.38inches at Hakalau. Elsewhere on the Big Island, Glenwood’sweekly total reached 31.29 inches. On Kauai, famously wetMount Waialeale netted a weekly sum of 17.18 inches.

Weekly Weather and Crop Bulletin4U.S. Drought MonitorJanuary 14, 2020January 7, 2020(Released Thursday, Jan. 9, 2020)Valid 7 a.m. ESTSSLSSLDrought Impact Types:Delineates dominant impactsSS Short-Term, typically less than6 months (e.g. agriculture, grasslands)SSL Long-Term, typically greater than6 months (e.g. hydrology, ecology)Intensity:NoneD0 Abnormally DryD1 Moderate DroughtD2 Severe DroughtD3 Extreme DroughtD4 Exceptional DroughtSLAuthor:Curtis RigantiNational Drought Mitigation CenterThe Drought Monitor focuses on broad-scale conditions.Local conditions may vary. For more information on theDrought Monitor, go to tmonitor.unl.edu

Weekly Weather and Crop BulletinNational Weather Data for Selected CitiesJanuary 14, 20205Weather Data for the Week Ending January 11, 2020Data Provided by Climate Prediction CenterAVERAGEMINIMUM90 AND ABOVE32 AND BELOW.01 INCHOR MORE.50 INCHOR MOREKSAVERAGEMAXIMUMIAPCT. NORMALSINCE JAN 1INTOTAL, IN.,SINCE JAN 1ILPCT. NORMALSINCE DEC 1IDTOTAL, IN.,SINCE DEC 1HIGREATEST IN24-HOUR, IN.GADEPARTUREFROM NORMALDCDEFLWEEKLYTOTAL, IN.CTDEPARTUREFROM NORMALCOAVERAGEARCAPRECIPEXTREMELOWAZTEMP. HOENIXPRESCOTTTUCSONFORT SMITHLITTLE ROCKBAKERSFIELDFRESNOLOS ANGELESREDDINGSACRAMENTOSAN DIEGOSAN FRANCISCOSTOCKTONALAMOSACO SPRINGSDENVER INTLGRAND ONDAYTONA BEACHJACKSONVILLEKEY WESTMIAMIORLANDOPENSACOLATALLAHASSEETAMPAWEST PALM T WAYNEINDIANAPOLISSOUTH BENDBURLINGTONCEDAR RAPIDSDES MOINESDUBUQUESIOUX CITYWATERLOOCONCORDIADODGE CITYGOODLANDTOPEKANUMBER OF TATIONAVERAGEMAXIMUMSTATESANDSTATIONSTEMPERATURE ed on 1971-2000 normals*** Not Available

Weekly Weather and Crop Bulletin6January 14, 2020Weather Data for the Week Ending January 11, 202090 AND ABOVE32 AND BELOW.01 INCHOR MORE.50 INCHOR MOREOHAVERAGEMINIMUMNDAVERAGEMAXIMUMNCPCT. NORMALSINCE JAN01NHNJNMNYTOTAL, IN.,SINCE JAN01NVPCT. NORMALSINCE DEC 1NETOTAL, IN.,SINCE DEC 1MTGREATEST IN24-HOUR, IN.MODEPARTUREFROM NORMALMSWEEKLYTOTAL, IN.MNDEPARTUREFROM NORMALMIAVERAGEMDMAPRECIPEXTREMELOWMETEMP. UCAHBATON ROUGELAKE CHARLESNEW CESTERALPENAGRAND RAPIDSHOUGHTON LAKELANSINGMUSKEGONTRAVERSE CITYDULUTHINT'L FALLSMINNEAPOLISROCHESTERST. CLOUDJACKSONMERIDIANTUPELOCOLUMBIAKANSAS CITYSAINT LOUISSPRINGFIELDBILLINGSBUTTECUT BANKGLASGOWGREAT FALLSHAVREMISSOULAGRAND ISLANDLINCOLNNORFOLKNORTH PLATTEOMAHASCOTTSBLUFFVALENTINEELYLAS SONFARGOGRAND LANDCOLUMBUSDAYTONMANSFIELDNUMBER OF TATIONAVERAGEMAXIMUMSTATESANDSTATIONSTEMPERATURE 4938