Attenborough Village Old Church, A Cricket Ground And .

8m ago
54 Views
0 Downloads
9.69 MB
25 Pages
Transcription

EREWASH VALLEY TRAILLocal points of interest Attenborough VillageAttenborough Nature Reserve Crown Copyright - All rights reserved 2010.At this point the trail passesthrough Attenborough NatureReserve. The trail headssouthwards towards the riverTrent following a bridlewayformerly called Barton Ferry Lane,named after the ferry which oncelinked to Barton in Fabis acrossthe river. The ferryman’s cottagestood at the end of the lane untilthe 1960’s.Attenborough is a pretty village with anold church, a cricket ground and bowlsgreen lying close to the river Trent. Theorigin of Attenborough lies in Saxon timesand derives from the name “Adenburgh”which means “the settlement of Adda’speople”. Adda is thought to have providedthe first chapel here, a clay and wattle“House of Prayer” in 946AD. The presentday stone chancel of St. Mary’s Churchis built on this site and is thought tohave existed in 1042. It is recorded in theDoomsday Book of 1086. Beeston LockIf you are following the trail southwardsyou will reach the river Trent and if youturn left (rather than right to follow thetrail) you will reach Beeston Lock aboutone and a half miles downstream. Hereyou can gain access to the busy townof Beeston or join the ten mile circularBig Track route which takes in the pathsalongside the Trent and Beeston Canal.You can also access Nottingham CityCentre, simply by following the canal orthe slightly longer riverside route. Big Track leaflets are usually available atBeeston Marina café or by visitingwww.thebigwheel.org.uk Mining in the Trent Valley Much of the area on the northern side ofthe River Trent between Cranfleet Lock andBeeston has been and continues to be usedfor gravel extraction creating a mosaic ofhabitats for wildlife and providing an excellent example of positive outcome from mining.Around the UK, many hundreds of active and restored quarries have been designated Sitesof Special Scientific Interest and many more restored sites are havens for wildlife, helpingto promote and sustain biodiversity. In this way, the act of extracting essential materialsfor the maintenance, development and enhancement of the built environment can oftenprovide an extremely beneficial outcome as farmland is transformed into much richer anddiverse habitats.On reaching the Trent the trail turns upstreamto the right. The Trent Valley is associated with anumber of long distance trails including the TrentValley Greenway which links Nottinghamshire andDerbyshire and the Trent Valley Way a long distanceEREWASH VALLEY TRAILWelcome to the Erewash Valley Trail which takesin over 30 miles of beautiful waterway andcountryside landscape on the Nottinghamshireand Derbyshire borders. The route is available forwalking and cycling and offers good access tothe fantastic wildlife and heritage features whichmake this area so interesting.The partners shown below work together toenhance the biodiversity, amenity and healthyliving opportunities in the valley and recognisingthe unique character of the area, this partnershipcreated the Trail in 2010. Substantial financialsupport from the 6C’s Green Infrastructure Fundas well as partner contributions, have enabledwork to improve habitats and access in the valleyand promote the opportunities it offers.The map above gives an overview of the Trailand the map to the right shows the trail as itpasses through this area along with local itemsof interest. A more detailed guide is available atwww.erewashvalleytrail.co.uk or through any ofthe partners. footpath running from Trent Lock for 75 miles to WestStockwith in Yorkshire.To the east the trail follows a bridleway towards thepretty village of Attenborough and its ancient church.Attenborough Nature Reserve is a former gravel quarrybut now a site of Special Scientific interest due toits rich wetland biodiversity. Attenborough holds aATTENBOROUGHNATURE RESERVEfantastic range of wildlife so for more informationand perhaps refreshment visit the award winningYOU ARE HEREnature centre next to the car park. The site is managedby Nottinghamshire Wildlife Trust in partnershipKey:with site owners CEMEX, Broxtowe Borough Council,Erewash Valley TrailAttenborough Management Committee and an armyShortcuts and Circular Routes(Not all suitable for cycling)of volunteers.LinksA and B RoadsWe are about 1½ miles from Beeston, 2 miles fromMotorwaysLong Eaton and 3 miles from Trent Lock.For more information see www.erewashvalleytrail.co.uk or call Broxtowe BoroughCouncil on 0115 9177777 or Erewash Borough Council on 0845 9072244.RailwaysRiver Trent / Trent Valley WayThe Erewash Valley Trail connects to theNational Cycle Network, co-ordinated bythe charity Sustrans. To find more routesto walk and cycle near you visitwww.sustrans.org.ukCanals and small riversproject partners include:DERBYSHIRENOTTINGHAMSHIREDelivery through Partnership

EREWASH VALLEY TRAILLocal points of interest Bramcote VillageBramcote Hills Park and the Hemlockstone Crown Copyright - All rights reserved 2010.At this point the trail enters a cornerof the park connecting with CoventryLane to the north and Ilkeston Roadand Stanley Drive to the south.Bramcote Hills Park is a delightful areaof parkland with a range of attractionsincluding a popular play area, fitnesstrail, cricket club, woodland naturereserve, memorial garden, ice houseand leisure centre. The award winningpark also has a programme ofseasonal events including the HemlockHappening - a celebration of localarts activities held in June. The park ismanaged through a local forum whichincludes user groups and schools tohelp to maximise the potential of thearea for people and wildlife.EREWASH VALLEY TRAILWelcome to the Erewash Valley Trail which takesin over 30 miles of beautiful waterway andcountryside landscape on the Nottinghamshireand Derbyshire borders. The route is available forwalking and cycling and offers good access tothe fantastic wildlife and heritage features whichmake this area so interesting.The partners shown below work together toenhance the biodiversity, amenity and healthyliving opportunities in the valley and recognisingthe unique character of the area, this partnershipcreated the Trail in 2010. Substantial financialsupport from the 6C’s Green Infrastructure Fundas well as partner contributions, have enabledwork to improve habitats and access in the valleyand promote the opportunities it offers.The map above gives an overview of the Trailand the map to the right shows the trail as itpasses through this area along with local itemsof interest. A more detailed guide is available atwww.erewashvalleytrail.co.uk or through any ofthe partners.The park is the site of ”The Hills”manor house and the footprint of thisimpressive property can be seen onthe edge of the woodland. The housewas built in 1805 and was home to theSherwin and the Gregory families. Oneof the last occupants before demolitionin 1966, were the FitzHerbert Wrights,great grand parents to Sarah FergusonDuchess of York.Across the road from the park is theHemlockstone an impressive naturalgeological feature created by millenniaof weathering. The stone stands in anature reserve and has many mythsassociated with its various usesand powers. One of the more likelysuggestions is that the stone was afocal point for Celtic festivals withrecords of Druids lighting fires on thestone during the night before May dayup until the early 19th Century.Along the edge of the woodlands atdusk you may see Common PipistrelleBats flying and the woodlands are alsohome to birds such as the Greaterspotted Woodpecker, Song Thrush,Bullfinch, Nuthatch, Treecreeper and insummer, Chiffchaff and Blackcap.The park is about 3 miles from Beestonand 4 miles from Ilkeston. Wollaton Hall & Deer ParkWollaton Hall is a spectacular Elizabethanmansion in the heart of Nottingham. Itis a prominent Grade One Listed buildingand following its major programme ofrestoration, visitors of all ages are welcometo visit the hall and park.BRAMCOTEHILLS PARKYOU ARE HEREStanding on a natural hill three miles westof Nottingham City Centre, Wollaton Hallis set in five hundred acres of spectaculargardens and parkland. The village lies astride a wooded sandstoneridge, which contributes considerably tothe character of the area. A distinctivefeature of this Conservation Area is the localsandstone walling, often with some coursesof stones laid in herringbone fashion. Mostdramatic of these are the high retainingwalls, which flank Chilwell Lane, forming a‘gateway’ as it winds into the village fromthe south. The church with its elegant spireis a landmark visible for miles around andcontrasts with the other church in thevillage St Lukes which is locally referred toas the Sunken Church. The village has goodexamples of framework knitters’ cottagesfronting Derby Road and a quaint old pubthe White Lion or “Top House” built in 1750.On site, in addition to the historic hall andits sumptuous grounds, visitors will findNottingham’s Natural History Museum,Nottingham’s Industrial Museum and the Yard Gallery. For information call 0115 915 3900. Stanton by Dale Dale AbbeyLying just over two miles from Bramcote,Stanton by Dale is a pretty village withcottages dating back to at least 1790 and achurch dating back to the 14th century. Thevillage once served workers at the ironworksnearby and having a single owner nowremains unspoilt by significant alteration.Two miles on from Stanton by Dale lies thesmall settlement of Dale Abbey which isdominated by the remains of a 13th centuryAbbey destroyed by Henry the Eighth in1538. Dale Abbey is also famous for itsHermit’s cave, once occupied by a localmonk giving rise to creation of the Abbey.Song ThrushPhotographer: Paul ShawNuthatchPhotographer: Paul ShawKey:Erewash Valley TrailShortcuts and Circular Routes(Not all suitable for cycling)LinksA and B RoadsMotorwaysRailwaysBlackcapPhotographer: Sean BrowneFor more information see www.erewashvalleytrail.co.uk or call Broxtowe BoroughCouncil on 0115 9177777 or Erewash Borough Council on 0845 9072244.River Trent / Trent Valley WayThe Erewash Valley Trail connects to theNational Cycle Network, co-ordinated bythe charity Sustrans. To find more routesto walk and cycle near you visitwww.sustrans.org.ukCanals and small riversproject partners include:DERBYSHIRENOTTINGHAMSHIREDelivery through Partnership

EREWASH VALLEY TRAILLocal points of interest Bennerley Viaduct and MarshThe valley at this point is dominatedby the Bennerley Viaduct which isover 1400 feet long and 60 feethigh. Built in 1877 by the GreatNorthern Railway this is an unusualwrought iron lattice bridge of whichthere are only two in the country.It is a grade 2 listed structure andalthough it was closed in 1973 itremains as testament to the richrailway heritage associated with thisarea. It also provides a great nestingand roosting spot for a range ofbirds including Kestrels.Bridge Street, Cotmanhay Crown Copyright - All rights reserved 2010.Cotmanhay is a great locationfor access to walking and cyclingroutes, wildlife and history.Erewash Valley TrailShortcuts and Circular Routes(Not all suitable for cycling)Links Ilkeston and the Erewash MuseumA and B RoadsThe Erewash Valley Trail follows the canaltowpath here but the eastern and western sidesof the trail are close at this point. Follow thepath away from the bridge towards the railwayand you will be rewarded with great views ofthe Bennerley Viaduct, interesting old meadowsand wetlands and once under the railway,fantastic views of the Erewash floodplain withthe meandering river. Follow the shortcut toreconnect with the trail on the eastern side orexplore the villages of Cossall and Awsworthor the town of Kimberley with its railway andbrewing heritage.EREWASH VALLEY TRAILWelcome to the Erewash Valley Trail which takesin over 30 miles of beautiful waterway andcountryside landscape on the Nottinghamshireand Derbyshire borders. The route is available forwalking and cycling and offers good access tothe fantastic wildlife and heritage features whichmake this area so interesting.The partners shown below work together toenhance the biodiversity, amenity and healthyliving opportunities in the valley and recognisingthe unique character of the area, this partnershipcreated the Trail in 2010. Substantial financialsupport from the 6C’s Green Infrastructure Fundas well as partner contributions, have enabledwork to improve habitats and access in the valleyand promote the opportunities it offers.The map above gives an overview of the Trailand the map to the right shows the trail as itpasses through this area along with local itemsof interest. A more detailed guide is available atwww.erewashvalleytrail.co.uk or through any ofthe partners.This is an excellent areafor wildlife habitats, notonly the wetlands of thevalley but impressive siteslike Shipley Country Park closeby. The wetlands are home to plants likeTrifid Bur-marigold and Water Crowfootand the wet meadows provide a greatdisplay of wildflowers in the spring. Thisvegetation in turn supports a vast insectpopulation providing food and coverfor birds and animals. Expect to hearWarblers, see Herons and perhaps enjoya glimpse of a Water Vole.There have been several interestingarchaeological finds near Cotmanhayincluding a Roman bronze coin dated to367-383 AD and a Neolithic flint knifethought to be part of a burial collectiondating back to around 2000 BC. Bothitems are held at the Erewash Museumin Ilkeston.The Erewash Valley Trail Partnershipgratefully acknowledges help providedby the Ilkeston and District HistorySociety in the preparation of thisinformation panel.Below the viaduct is an areawhich was opencast in the 1980s. It floods seasonally from the River Erewashand provides an important site for wetland birds including Snipe, Golden Plover,Redshank and Lapwing. The summer brings a range of Dragon Flies and DamselFlies such as Black Tailed Skimmers and Red-Eyed Damselflies.Key:MotorwaysRailwaysRiver Trent / Trent Valley WayCanals and small rivers BRIDGE STREETYOU ARE HEREIl