The Top 10 Benefits Of Pulses - Today's Dietitian Magazine

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The Top 10 Benefits of PulsesFrom Lentils & Chickpeas to Dry Peas & BeansJanuary 27, 2021 2-3 p.m. ETUSA Dry Pea & Lentil Council was approved by the CDR to offer 1.0 CPEU for this webinar.Amy Myrdal Miller, MS, RDN, FAND Founder & PresidentFarmer’s Daughter Consulting Carmichael, California

Amy Myrdal Miller, MS, RDN, FANDFounder & PresidentFarmer’s Daughter Consulting, Inc.Carmichael, [email protected] B.S. in Dietetics, University of California, Davis Dietetic Internship, University of MinnesotaHospital & Clinics M.S. in Nutrition Communication, Tufts UniversitySchool of Nutrition Science & PolicyEmployment History Fleishman Hillard, 1997-1998 Rippe Lifestyle Institute, 1998-2000 Dole Food Company, 2000-2005 California Walnut Commission, 2005-2007 The Culinary Institute of America, 2007-2014 Farmer’s Daughter Consulting, 2014-present

Financial Disclosures Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics Research DPG – honorarium for webinarAmerican Egg Board / Egg Nutrition Center - consultantBayer Crop Science – L.E.A.D. Network Member, consultantBayer Vegetable Seeds – Horticultural Advisory Council memberBeef Checkoff– member of Beef Expert Bureau, honoraria for speakingCalifornia Foundation for Agriculture in the Classroom – honoraria for speakingDairy Council of California – honoraria for speakingDole Packaged Foods, LLC - consultantDuda Farm Fresh Foods, Inc. - consultantHinoman USA - consultantHZPC Americas Corp. - consultantNational Dairy Council – Ambassador, consultantNational Resource Center on Nutrition and Aging – consultantNorth American Meat Institute - honorariumPacific Northwest Canned Pear Service – consultantPhoenix Media Network / Produce Business Magazine – columnist, honoraria for speakingPotatoes USA – honoraria for speakingProduce for Better Health Foundation – consultantTexas A&M AgriLife – External Advisory Board memberThe Culinary Institute of America – consultantUniversity of California Davis Honey and Pollination Center – honoraria for speakingUSA Pulses / USA Dry Pea & Lentil Council – consultant, honorarium for this webinar

Learning ObjectivesAfter attending this webinar, participants will be able to:1. Cite at least three nutrition and health benefits of pulses(e.g., dry peas, dry beans, lentils, and chickpeas).2. Discuss budget-friendly benefits of cooking with pulses.3. List at least three consumer-friendly tips for cookingwith pulses.4. Cite two resources for RDNs and consumers who areseeking more information on pulses.

Suggested Performance Indicators1.3.2 — Recognizes the strengths and limitations of a customer.6.2.5 — Applies research/evidence-based findings to improvepractice, service delivery, and health and nutrition ofcustomers.8.1.3 — Interprets and applies current food and nutritionscience and principles in dietetics practice.8.4.3 — Demonstrates and applies knowledge of culinarypractices to effect behavioral change, taking into considerationcustomer needs and demands.

What’s the difference between a legume and a pulse? A legume refers to a plantfrom the Fabaceae family. A pulse is the dry, edibleseed from a legume plantthat is harvested dry.

The Top 10 Benefits of Pulses1. Pulses can count as either a vegetable or protein source.2. Pulses provide a good source of protein.3. Pulses are an excellent source of dietary fiber.4. Most pulses are a good source of iron.5. Pulses are natural sources of zinc, magnesium, and choline.6. Pulses are naturally gluten-free.7. Pulses are a low-cost ingredient.8. Pulses are a very versatile ingredient.9. Pulses can help reduce food waste.10. Pulses are sustainable, eco-friendly crops.

The Top 10 Benefits of Pulses1. Pulses can count as either a vegetable or protein source.2. Pulses provide a good source of protein.3. Pulses are an excellent source of dietary fiber.4. Most pulses are a good source of iron.5. Pulses are natural sources of zinc, magnesium, and choline.6. Pulses are naturally gluten-free.7. Pulses are a low-cost ingredient.8. Pulses are a very versatile ingredient.9. Pulses can help reduce food waste.10.Pulses are sustainable, eco-friendly crops.

Pulses can count as either a vegetable or protein source.1 vegetable serving 1 cup cooked lentils,chickpeas, dry peas, orbeansSources: Vegetables MyPlate, Protein Foods MyPlate1 oz. protein equivalent ¼ cup cooked lentils,chickpeas, dry peas, or beans;2 tablespoons hummus;1 cup lentil soup 2 oz-equivalent1 cup bean soup 3/4 oz-equivalent1 cup split pea soup 1 oz-equivalent

Americans who eat more pulsesare more likely to meet their nutrient needs. NHANES data show beans, peas, and legumes are consumed in relatively small amounts,at an average of 0.1 cup eq/day (or 1 tablespoon). Americans reporting 3 meals per day were more likely to have higher intake of severaladequacy components, including total vegetables, greens and beans, compared toAmericans who eat 2 meals per day.Source: US Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service. Food Patterns Equivalents Intakes from Food:Mean Amounts Consumed per Individual, by Gender and Age, What We Eat in America, NHANES 2015-2016.

How Pulses Fit Into USDA FoodPatternsFood GroupVegetables(cups/week) Beans, peas,lentilsProtein Foods(oz eq/week) Beans, peas,lentilsHealthy U.S.Style PatternVegetarianPatternMediterraneanStyle Pattern2,000 calories/day2,000 calories/day2,000 calories/ day1.51.51.561.5 cups / weekSources: (1) Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee. 2020. Scientific Report of the 2020 Dietary GuidelinesAdvisory Committee: Advisory Report to the Secretary of Agriculture and the Secretary of Health and HumanServices. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service, Washington, DC. (2) Dietary Guidelinesfor Americans, 2020-2025 (3) Vegetables MyPlate

The Top 10 Benefits of Pulses1. Pulses can count as either a vegetable or protein source.2. Pulses provide a good source of protein.3. Pulses are an excellent source of dietary fiber.4. Most pulses are a good source of iron.5. Pulses are natural sources of zinc, magnesium, and choline.5. Pulses are naturally gluten-free.7. Pulses are a low-cost ingredient.8. Pulses are a very versatile ingredient.9. Pulses can help reduce food waste.10.Pulses are sustainable, eco-friendly crops.

Pulses provide a good source of protein.A “good source” provides 10-19% of the Daily Value (50 grams).PulsePortionProtein (g)% Daily BeansSplit PeasBlackBeans½ cupcooked½ cupcooked½ cupcooked½ cupcooked½ cupcooked½ cupcooked½ cupcooked778988814%14%16%18%16%16%16%

A Quick Pulse Protein Quiz1. Which contains more protein?a. ½ cup of cooked black beansb. ½ cup of cooked corn2. Which contains more protein?a. ½ cup of cooked lentilsb. ½ cup of cooked quinoa3. Which contains more protein?a. ½ cup of chickpeasb. ½ cup of cooked brown rice

A Quick Pulse Protein Quiz1. Which contains more protein?a. ½ cup of cooked black beans (8 grams)b. ½ cup of cooked corn (2.5 grams)2. Which contains more protein?a. ½ cup of cooked lentils (9 grams)b. ½ cup of cooked quinoa (4 grams)3. Which contains more protein?a. ½ cup of chickpeas ( 7 grams)b. ½ cup of cooked brown rice (2.5 grams)

The Top 10 Benefits of Pulses1.2.3.4.5.5.6.7.8.9.Pulses can count as either a vegetable or protein source.Pulses provide a good source of protein.Pulses are an excellent source of dietary fiber.Most pulses are a good source of iron.Pulses are natural sources of zinc, magnesium, and choline.Pulses are naturally gluten-free.Pulses are a low-cost ingredient.Pulses are a very versatile ingredient.Pulses can help reduce food waste.Pulses are sustainable, eco-friendly crops.

Pulses are an excellent source of dietary fiber.An “excellent source” provides 20% or more of the Daily Value (25 lsPintoBeansSplit PeasBlackBeansPortion½ cupcooked½ cupcooked½ cupcooked½ cupcooked½ cupcooked½ cupcooked½ cupcookedFiber (g)6668887% DailyValue21%21%21%29%29%29%25%Adequate Intake (AI) for FiberMen, ages 19-50 38 g/dayWomen, ages 19-50 25 g/day

Nutrients of Public Health ConcernNutrients of SubstantialPublic Health Concern forall Americans age 1 andolder: Vitamin D Calcium Dietary fiber (meanintake 16.4 g/day) PotassiumNutrients UnderConsumed by theEntire Population: Magnesium Choline Vitamin A Vitamin C Vitamin E Vitamin KNutrients Under-Consumedby Females of ReproductiveAge: Iron FolateNutrient Under-Consumedby Adolescent Girls: ProteinNutrient Under-Consumedby Older Adults Protein Vitamin B12Source: Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee. 2020. Scientific Report of the 2020 Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee: Advisory Report to the Secretary of Agriculture and theSecretary of Health and Human Services. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service, Washington, DC.

A Quick Primer on Fiber Dietary Fiber is defined as nondigestible carbohydrates and lignin that are intrinsicand intact in plants. Functional Fiber is defined as isolated, nondigestible carbohydrates (e.g., inulin) thathave been shown to have beneficial physiological effects in humans. Total Fiber is the sum of Dietary Fiber and Functional Fiber. Viscous (e.g., soluble) fibers delay the gastric emptying of ingested foods into thesmall intestine, which can result in a sensation of fullness. This delayed emptyingeffect also results in reduced postprandial blood glucose concentrations. Viscous fibers can also interfere with the absorption of dietary fat and cholesterol,as well as the enterohepatic recirculation of cholesterol and bile acids, which mayresult in reduced blood cholesterol concentrations. The Adequate Intake (AI) for dietary fiber is based on the association between higherintakes of fiber and reduced risk of coronary heart disease.Source: Dietary Reference Intakes for Energy, Carbohydrate, Fiber, Fat, Fatty Acids, Cholesterol, Protein, and Amino Acids. National Academies Press

The Top 10 Benefits of Pulses1.2.3.4.5.5.6.7.8.9.Pulses can count as either a vegetable or protein source.Pulses provide a good source of protein.Pulses are an excellent source of dietary fiber.Most pulses are a good source of iron.Pulses are natural sources of zinc, magnesium, and choline.Pulses are naturally gluten-free.Pulses are a low-cost ingredient.Pulses are a very versatile ingredient.Pulses can help reduce food waste.Pulses are sustainable, eco-friendly crops.

Most pulses are a good source of iron.A “good source” provides 10-19% of the Daily Value (18 mg).PulsePortionIron (mg)% Daily BeansSplit PeasBlackBeans½ cupcooked½ cupcooked½ cupcooked½ cupcooked½ cupcooked½ cupcooked½ cupcooked222321210%10%10%15%10%6%10%

Heme versus Non-Heme Iron in Foods Heme iron is found in blood and muscle.Non-heme iron comes from plant-based sources.Heme iron is more bioavailable.The absorption of non-heme iron can be improved bycombining foods rich in vitamin C—like canned tomatoproducts—with foods that contain non-heme iron. Cooking in cast iron can increase iron intake; ironleaches from the pan into the food, especially whenvitamin C-rich ingredients are used in cooking. The iron requirement for people who eat a vegetariandiet is approximately twice that of people who consumenon-vegetarian diets.

The Top 10 Benefits of Pulses1. Pulses can count as either a vegetable or protein source.2. Pulses provide a good source of protein.3. Pulses are an excellent source of dietary fiber.4. Most pulses are a good source of iron.5. Pulses are natural sources of zinc, magnesium and choline.6. Pulses are naturally gluten-free.7. Pulses are a low-cost ingredient.8. Pulses are a very versatile ingredient.9. Pulses can help reduce food waste.10.Pulses are sustainable, eco-friendly crops.

Pulses are natural sources of zinc, magnesium, and choline.DAILYVALUEPulsePortion11 mgZinc (mg)420 mg Magnesium (mg)*Choline (mg)BlackeyedPeasChickpeas KidneyBeansLentilsPintoBeansSplitPeasBlackBeans½ cupcooked½ cupcooked½ cupcooked½ cupcooked½ cupcooked½ cupcooked½ 628312928The Adequate Intake (AI) for choline, as established by the Food and Nutrition Board of the National Institute of Medicine, foradults is 550 mg per day for men and breastfeeding women; 425 mg per day for women; and 450 mg per day for pregnantwomen.Source: FoodData Central (usda.gov), data accessed December 15, 2020

Pulses are natural sources of zinc, magnesium, and choline. Zinc: under-consumed by most Americans Magnesium: under-consumed by most Americans, especially women who arepregnant and lactating Choline: intake of choline is below the Adequate Intake (AI) for several segments ofthe population, including pregnant and lactating women“Encourage women to consume foods and beverages that aregood sources of iron, folate, calcium, choline, magnesium,protein, fiber, and other potential shortfall nutrients.”Scientific Report of the 2020 Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee, Chapter 2, Strategies for Women of Reproductive Age

The Top 10 Benefits of Pulses1. Pulses can count as either a vegetable or protein source.2. Pulses provide a good source of protein.3. Pulses are an excellent source of dietary fiber.4. Most pulses are a good source of iron.5. Pulses are natural sources of zinc, magnesium, and choline.6. Pulses are naturally gluten-free.7. Pulses are a low-cost ingredient.8. Pulses are a very versatile ingredient.9. Pulses can help reduce food waste.10. Pulses are sustainable, eco-friendly crops.

Who needs or wants gluten-free foods? People with celiac disease (1% of U.S. population or3.3 million Americans). People with non-celiac gluten sensitivity (1-3% ofU.S. population or 3.3 million to 10 millionAmericans). In the IFIC 2020 Food & Health Survey, 6% ofr